My Favorite Modern Black Side Tables

Modern black side tables are versatile pieces that can work with modern or traditional decor. They can add a more modern twist to a more traditional design (like the below design from DecorMatters), or they can add contrast and drama to a minimalist room just as easily.

I recently used a modern black side table in a dark and moody study design in DecorMatters. The problem with spending time playing interior design games is that you create beautiful designs but don’t realize the items you’re choosing are luxury items. Then… you fall in love with the pieces you choose. Like this gorgeous side table by Arteriors. Dilemma. Do you fork out $1480 for a side table? Or find a cheaper alternative?

My DecorMatters design using the Scout Side Table by Arteriors

After falling in love with the Scout Side Table by Arteriors I decide to try and find a cheaper alternative. Here’s my pick of the best modern black side tables.

Scout Modern Black Side Table by Arteriors

Modern black side table by Arteriors

Let’s start at the beginning, where this all started. The Scout Side Table by Arteriors is voluptuous and beautiful. It’s made from sand blasted wood to give it a charred look. Then finished with a wax coat to give it a shine. Priced at $1480 it’s the most expensive on the list.

Kellaman Drum End Table by Upper Square

Modern black side table by Upper Square

Another textured end table, this time made from stone. The Kellaman Drum End Table is a sturdy piece that won’t fall over easily. It can also be used outdoors which is a bonus. Priced at $241 and is available from Wayfair.

Fernando Accent Table by Crate & Barrel

Modern black side table by Crate & Barrel

The Fernando Accent Table from Crate & Barrel is a beautiful piece. I love the texture of this table from the handcrafted hammered iron finish. This is the piece I’ll be buying for my living room from this list. I love the organic shape of it and of course the texture. Priced at $249 it’s great value.

Macbeth Hemlock Modern Black Side Table by CB2

Black wood side table by CB2

Another beautiful table, the Macbeth Hemlock Side Table has great texture from the wire-brushed matte black wood. Made of solid Canadian hemlock wood and priced at $349, it’s a little more expensive than the Crate & Barrel option, but is still a great value piece.

Aurea Modern Black Side Table by Kathy Kuo Home

Textured side table by Kathy Kuo Home

A stunning side table by Kathy Kuo Home. The Aurea Side Table is made from oak and oak veneer, and has a ribbed texture on the plinth to give an interesting profile. Priced at $688, it’s the second most expensive on the list, but is certainly worth the splurge.

Black Iron Contemporary Accent Table by Studio 350

Contemporary side table by Studio 350

The base of the Black Iron Contemporary Accent Table is made from iron and the top from real marble. Although it doesn’t have texture like the others, at a price of $172 it’s a bargain considering the luxe materials. Available from Overstock, this is a great cheaper alternative.

I hope you liked the list of modern black side tables. It shows that if you do fall in love with an expensive piece, it’s definitely worth shopping around to find a more affordable alternative.

For other luxe looks for less tips, you should check out these other blogs:

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My favorite modern black side tables

Modern or Traditional Cabins?

As the temperatures start to rise in the Midwest and winter finally starts to release its tight grip, people start dreaming of being at their cabins. But with the current pandemic and stay at home orders it’s not possible right now to travel. So why not use this time to start planning a cabin makeover for when you can finally get back to that little piece of heaven on the lake?

Living in Minnesota, the vacation rental market is all about cabins, lots of them! Something I’ve come to realize is that to be a true Minnesotan, you have to vacation in a cabin ‘up North’ at some point during the year. Before the pandemic happened, my husband and I and our two dogs went to stay in Biwabik, Minnesota at the Giants Ridge Ski Resort in one of the lakeside cabins. I soon began to understand why this type of vacation is so popular.

A frozen lake at Biwabik, Minnesota
A frozen lake at Biwabik, Minnesota

The purpose of our trip was actually to purchase one of these cabins as an investment property, but after a lot of back and forth we concluded it wasn’t going to be a good deal for us. But it did get me thinking about design…

So many of the cabins I’ve seen are of the traditional style – log walls or golden timber cladding, plaid, a moose picture somewhere, or maybe even a bear, giant stone fireplaces and furniture made out of logs. It’s certainly cozy, and don’t get me wrong I do like it, but what about the alternatives?

Big Moose, New York Log Home rustic-living-room

I’m like a kid in a candy store when it comes to shopping for houses. I’ve already decorated the bathrooms, and laid out the soaps in my head before I’ve even made an offer! This was no different. I started to research ‘modern cabins’ online and found my new favorite style. Here’s a collection of my favorite.

Like this simple, cozy and elegant bathroom by Baucos Group.

Cabin Master Bath modern-bathroom

Or this amazing modern kitchen by PurParket Inc.

PurParket Porcelain- CABIN Project Sales Centre modern-kitchen

Or this kitchen design by CLB Architects. I love that they’ve transformed the chunky traditional log cabin walls just by painting them white.

Yellowbell Renovation rustic-kitchen

I love the juxtaposition of the modern clean lines against the traditional log cabin wall here in this design by Haus.

Scandinavian Rustic Cabin scandinavian-powder-room

Or this cozy little reading nook by Fernau and Hartman. They’ve kept the warm golden wood cladding but styled it in a more modern feel.

Outdoor living in Palo Alto scandinavian-family-room

This bathroom by First Lamp Architects is a beautiful balance of warm wood and clean modern whites.

Herron Island Cabin Master Shower / Tub modern-bathroom

This design by Marcusse Construction is a little more transitional with the shaker style kitchen cabinets, but definitely has the muted pallet and warm Scandinavian vibe.

Blackshire scandinavian-living-room

A beautiful entrance way by DeForest Architects. I love how everything is so simple and clean, except for the beautiful piece of old gnarly wood they’ve used on the wall as decoration.

High Desert Modern modern-entry

The Scandanavian style can even translate to the staircase. I love this design by Texas Construction Company.

Clifford Residence scandinavian-staircase

And don’t forget about the exterior. This bold barn style cabin in black by Alchemy Architects is just about as perfect as it gets.

Winhall Barnhouse farmhouse-exterior

So which do you prefer? Are you a traditional log cabin lover? Or do you prefer the clean lines of the modern Scandinavian style cabins? I hope this post has inspired you to re-think the traditional cabin look just a little bit. To see the possibilities of what else they could be.

Thanks for reading.

Jo @Britflipper

 

Continuous Improvement

The subject of today’s blog is along the theme of ‘continuous improvement’. It’s a term we regularly use at work in a quality / lean process sort of a way, to signify the journey towards being world class in something. Never stopping with being satisfied with what you did today, and always striving to do better. It seemed like the perfect title for the design journey I’ve been on over the past few years.

The entrance hallway in our house is the perfect example of how skills evolve, and admitting that sometimes you don’t get it right the first time.

This is our hallway when we first moved into our 1969-built Prairie Style Minnesotan home. It was very beige, and very dated.

photo-007
Hallway when we moved in (circa 1969)

I set about renovating it to make it feel more like a modern cabin (as we live in the woods.) I tried to make it feel rustic with the use of the aged wood wall partition that we made, and the antler chandelier. To give it a modern twist, I added faux taxidermy in white only on the gallery wall.

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Hallway after reno No.1

To give it more of a British hunting lodge / country feel, I opted for flagstone style flooring, and added things like the antique umbrella stand and horse bit artwork. We gave the wall a gold paint effect finish to add some richness and the traditional feel.

But it felt dark…

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After living in the house for 4 years now, I’ve come to realize that living in the middle of the woods, with such heavy tree coverage, that the only time the house is ever bright inside is during the winter when there are no leaves on the trees. So the decoration inside has to account for this lack of natural light.

The other thing I’ve noticed whilst living in the US, is the growing trend for light, bright and airy spaces. Practically every new-build and renovated home has white-painted trim. The spaces are made bright from large white windows and white or light grey walls. Any wood is generally kept natural, such as natural white oak.

After living here for a while now, my tastes have evolved to the more contemporary side, so we set about with renovation No.2 to our hallway…

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Hallway today (after lessons learnt)

We removed the aged-wood partition wall we made, as we felt it made the space darker, and the dark wood made it feel a little dated. We opted instead for a more open half wall, which we painted in white and grey to match the new open-plan kitchen / dining room. And changed all the floors for natural white oak.

The biggest change was to the feature wall. Now when you enter the house, you’re met with a wall of white split-face marble, which adds depth and texture to the room, whilst still being bright, and yet at the same time, rustic.

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I had to keep the antler chandelier, it’s the little nod to the modern hunting lodge theme we were originally trying to achieve. I think now we’ve actually managed to achieve it. By keeping the colors light and limited, and introducing interest through texture, and pops of natural wood colors.

I’m the first to admit that my first attempt at ‘modern cabin’ was not that successful. But with a few more years of experience of both living in this house, in the US and having completed many more renovation projects, I can gladly say my skills have improved for the better.

To quote Lloyd Dobyns:

“Continual improvement is an unending journey.”

Thanks for reading, until next time.

Jo (aka Britflipper and continuous improvement seeker)